• Jesse Smith

You are not alone.

This time at home has given us all more time to reflect.


Some of those thoughts are probably helpful as we attempt to prepare for what now seems inevitable, but I imagine, that some of our more obsessive thoughts are probably not helpful at all. Unfortunately, helpful and unhelpful thoughts seem to roll through our minds without a reliable filtering system for what is actually helpful and what is not.


How long is this going to last?

How is this going to affect my family?

Are my kids going to be at home forever now?

How is this going to affect my work? My employees?

How low can the stock market go?

How will this impact others I care about?

Do we have enough toilet paper?

Will medical professionals get the personal protective equipment they need?


In an anxious world, where can we find peace and strength? Where can we find hope not only for ourselves but enough hope to share with others? I’ve always found this in personal and public worship and when I meet with other people who challenge and encourage me. And all of that has become more difficult in this season of social distancing.


I sense that last week was that surreal adrenaline rush time with the newness of all the changes. People were willing to go the extra mile to check on friends and loved ones. Several people wrote cards or made calls to shut-in neighbors. Our food pantry at the church ran over with many much-needed items. Small group leaders found new and creative ways to connect with their group members.


And this week, the weight and reality of it all are starting to set in.


Yesterday at church, I made the analogy that “life is like a group project.” At the beginning of any group project, I feel energized and ready to start. Then it is easy for me to get overwhelmed and let time go by without attending to the things I need to attend to. And finally, I try to cram everything in at the last minute.

I don’t want our church to lose momentum during this crisis. I don’t want us to miss opportunities for us to continue to do good. I remember the words written to the church in the city of Galatia 20 centuries ago:


Let’s not get tired of doing what is good. At just the right time we will reap a harvest of blessing if we don’t give up. - Galatians 6:9

If you feel tired and overwhelmed today, you are not alone. We are in this together. We will encourage one another. We will do good things together. You are not alone. This is a group project.



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